There Are 16 Word Games for Seniors that Can Help Prevent Dementia

On April 1, 2011, my career of 35 years in teaching came to a close. I had trouble meeting deadlines, and I could only concentrate on one thing at a time. My inability to retain what I’ve just been told was frustrating for me. The staff were getting worried. At first I didn’t face up to the fact that I had Dementia. I thought of it as ‘forgetful’ and ‘scatty’, but I was no longer able to deal with shopping or money. The less I could do, the more restless I became. My needs were becoming more demanding, as I needed increasing help with dressing, toileting and bathing.

Anna’s sad story is just one of the thousands of stories told by seniors who have Dementia and unaware of the healing power of word games for seniors. Statistics show that 1 out of every 14 people over 65 in the UK has Dementia, which significantly impacts their lives and society. In 2015, more than 50 million people were living with Dementia, and unfortunately, as the population grows and ages, the number of people affected will likely surpass 130 million by 2050.

Why Word Games?

Memory loss and behavioural changes are the first signs of Dementia. Slowly but relentlessly, cognition declines, language is disrupted, and behaviour changes occur, diminishing a person’s independence. Many people think there’s no escape in this stage, and their lives have ended. However, we are here to tell you Dementia is not an end. By keeping the mind active, Dementia’s adverse effects can be kept at bay or minimized.
Word games are among the top activities that can actually prevent the eventual onset of Dementia in seniors. A Harvard study has shown that you can help prevent cognitive decline with good health practices such as playing word games. Indeed, word games reinforce your ability to retrieve memories and think; it also involves employing mental skills at once: memory, visualization, and sequencing; this clearly explains why seniors playing word games have improved their attention, reasoning, and memory tests scores.
For the same reason, we have listed the top 16 word games for seniors that can help them in preventing Dementia. Moreover, if you enjoy games and are looking for new ways to spend time with your loved ones, check out top games for seniors to entertain themselves.

Here are the top 16 word games for seniors:

1. Words in Words

Word Games for Seniors

A fun brain game for seniors! As well as providing mental stimulation and social interaction, it helps promote self-esteem. This game keeps seniors entertained as well as exercising their minds. Brain games can improve cognitive function, slow cognitive decline, and possibly prevent degenerative diseases such as depression, Alzheimer‘s disease, and dementia.

To play Word in Word, First, you need a large piece of paper or a whiteboard. Ask a player to think of a word for the game. As long as the word is not too short, you can choose any word. Then, write the words on a whiteboard and ask participants to make other words using only the letters in words.

2. Scrabble

Word Games for Seniors

One of the best word games for seniors! Games such as Scrabble are excellent for increasing brainpower. You can play Scrabbles with just two players or more. And can be an excellent way of improving your vocabulary. Make sure to get an extensive letter to scrabble if you have eyesight problems. This classic word game is played on a board with squares marked with letter tiles. The points value of letters is based on their frequency. (Some squares will score more points.) In the end, scrabble looks like a crossword: a collection of words overlapping one another.

3. Boggle

Word Games for Seniors

Boggle is a two-player game with no maximum. This word game uses 16 letter cubes, a cube grid with a dome on top, and a 3-minute timer, which should all be included with your game. In this game, the highest point total wins. The game’s objective is to create words from the randomly sorted letters in the grid by fitting them together. Boggle’s rules state that words with a longer length have a higher point value.

4. Big Letter Bananagrams

A Bananagrams is a fast and easy word game that doesn’t require pencils, papers, or a board, and the tiles are packaged in fabric banana bags. Similar to card games for seniors, in just five minutes, you can play one hand.

To play this word game, put all 144 tiles face down in the middle of the table. They make up the “Bunch.” Now, each player takes their ‘Starting Titles’ from the Bunch:

  • Start with 21 tiles each for 2-4 players.
  • Start with 15 tiles each for 5-6 players.
  • 7-8 players: each player starts with 11 tiles.

Any player can start by calling out “Split!” Each person turns their tile face up simultaneously, arranging it in their intersecting word grid. Horizontally or vertically, words must be readable from left to right. Whenever you like, you can rearrange your grid. Big Letter Bananagrams is one of the best hobbies for seniors.

5. Complete the Saying

Word Games for Seniors

By using famous sayings, idioms, and proverbs from their past, seniors will be able to play a matching game. It can result in pleasant reminiscences and conversation. It can be adapted to suit various abilities and can be played by people living with dementia disease. Depending on the level of the players, cut each proverb or saying in half or leave out the last word.

6. Upwords

This brain game is on the list of fun brain games for seniors. The Upwords board game is a three-dimensional Scrabble-like game for two to four players. As well as a plastic game board, 100 plastic letters tiles, and four plastic tile racks, the game includes a label sheet. As in a crossword puzzle, players stack the tiles to spell out words by playing letters across or down. In Upwords, players can also stack letters on top of each other to make new words. With Upwords, you can build your vocabulary while having fun with your family.

7. Hangman

Word Games for Seniors

To play this fun brain game for seniors, you only need paper and a pen. Hangman word game is played with 2 to 4 people.

The first person comes up with a word or phrase, and the others guess it one letter at a time. The player draws several dashes equal to the number of letters in the word. After that, guessing players suggest letters that occur in the word, and the remaining players fill in the blanks with the suggested letters in the right place.

If the word they choose doesn’t contain the suggested letter, the other player draws an element of a hangman’s gallows. For every suggested letter not found in the word, a segment of the gallows and a victim is added. A character in a noose provides a minimum of six incorrect guesses to the players until the game ends. The first player to guess the correct answer thinks of the word for the next game.

8. Word Search

Word Games for Seniors

Playing Word Search puzzles is a fun and relaxing activity for seniors. The rules are simple. An alphabet grid and a word list accompany each puzzle. Locate all the words and phrases that are hidden in the grid and circle them. In addition to horizontally and vertically, forwards and backwards are possible directions to hide the words. You can play this game solo.

9. Crossword Puzzles

Word Games for Seniors

This classic word game is one of the most popular hobbies for seniors since it stimulates the mind. In this activity, seniors look at clues and then try to think of words that match the clues to use their language and memory skills. This word game engages more than one area of the brain simultaneously, as seniors need to consider both word length and letter positioning. Therefore, create your crossword puzzle for your loved one if regular crossword puzzles are too complex.

10. Rhyming Ball

Playing this game keeps your brain and thinking skills sharp. The Rhyming Ball game is a simple word game that seniors can play in groups of 2 to 20 people. It begins when players throw a ball to a player, who then has to develop a word. Using the ball, players throw it to other participants, who have to rhyme every following word. You can use this game to enhance your loved one’s vocabulary and critical thinking skills.

Top 6 Online Word Games for Seniors

Thanks to the internet, seniors can avoid loneliness by socializing and using technology. Online games are a great way to keep seniors entertained, in addition to allowing them to interact with friends and family. You can find various games for seniors, ranging from games that enhance your cognitive skills to simple, fun games that you can play on your own. Here is a list of the top five online word games for seniors.

11. Witty Words

Witty Words‘ is a word game developed especially for seniors to improve cognitive function, combat dementia, and stimulate the brain. With this game, seniors can test their vocabulary and brain with word connections and daily crossword puzzles. Each new chapter and word becomes more difficult as the game progresses.

You can combat dementia and Alzheimer’s disease by playing Witty Word.

Download Now

12. Eight Letters

Eight letters is a fun brain game for seniors. You’ll have to create words using the eight letters presented to you on the screen to earn points. The longer the word, the more points it earns.

Play Now

13. Daily Quick Crossword

The classic crossword puzzle is a popular word game among senior citizens, but that is more a stereotype than real. AARP Games features several online crossword puzzles, including a daily crossword solution. This game has an intuitive interface that makes clues easy to read. It’s possible to reveal letters, words, or the entire puzzle if you’re stuck.

Play Now

14. Cryptogram Quotations

It’s a lot like starring in a Hollywood thriller when you play the role of an international spy. In Cryptogram Quotations, the secret message is deciphered by using a substitution code. It has been encrypted, with letters substituted for each other. To solve this clue, you will need to use your knowledge of spelling patterns and sentence structure.

Play Now

15. CrossCraze Pro

CrossCraze Pro is a fun word game for seniors similar to Scrabble. The generic mode requires linking new words to existing words on the board. The second mode is to drop new tiles over existing ones to create words in that way. You can play with friends or with an AI with ten levels of difficulty. Furthermore, nine languages are supported, as are 12 board themes and 28 layouts. A hint system is also available for those who need it.

Download Now

16. The Word Search

Word search puzzles have been among the top hobbies for seniors for years with paper and pencil. Seniors can also enjoy word searches digitally as fantastic online games. There are many different types of word search puzzles to be found over at The Word Search.

Play Now

 

Final Words

It’s an old myth that you only use 10 percent of your brainYou actually use all of it, even when you are sleeping. Neurologists verify that your brain is always active, and you need to keep it that way. Environment, exercise and healthy eating are all involved in this journey, and the numerous benefits of games for older adults are tested and proved.

Word games for seniors are a great way for socializing and reducing stress levels, so give them a try and come back here to share your experience and questions with others in the comment section.

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Celia
Celia
9 months ago

I love the word search, I haven’t played it in a long time, but it was one of my favourite games when I was a student. Big Letter Bananagrams is also a great game; I play it with my son and granddaughter every week. I haven’t tried the other games, except the crossword puzzle and scrabble.

Velma.Land
Velma.Land
9 months ago

Thanks for the great games; I have all forgotten about word games. I remember playing a game called bulls and cows with my parents. It wasn’t precisely a word game, somehow similar to the hangman; only it was played with numbers. 

Elsie
Elsie
9 months ago

After 58 years, I still love scrabble. I was a literature student, so I remember having a lot of fun playing it with my friends and making them mad with choosing complicated, difficult-to-remember words to play. Honestly, some of the best parts of my time were spent playing this game.

Noah
Noah
Reply to  Elsie
8 months ago

I agree! Playing scramble is an inseparable part of our plans whenever we hang out with our friends, and we really enjoy it. We have pretty fun and enjoying time by scramble.

John
John
9 months ago

Oh, hangman is just so fun for me. I don’t know why because it is a very simple game, but it is my favourite word game. It’s always my number one suggestion when my family and I decide to play a game.

Lori
Lori
8 months ago

Sometimes I think if someone takes crossword puzzles from me, I would have no other way to survive. I’d die out of boredom without them. Solving one is literally my number one activity whenever I’m free.

Douglas
Douglas
8 months ago

For some reason, my grandchildren love playing word search games with me. I have a huge collection of similar games, and they show a lot of interest in them whenever they visit me. I really enjoy playing with them, too.

Mary
Mary
4 months ago

I LOVE Scrabble and crosswords.
I need the distraction, and I find them soothing. Focusing on an entirely different set of “problems” often allows me to see a useful solution to a work-related situation by letting my mind to be fully absorbed in something else for a few minutes.
I know they are supposed to teach me multitasking, but the whole concept seems ridiculous to me.
If you have four things to do, why not give each ALL of your attention? There will be fewer mistakes, chances are the same amount of time will be spent, and it’s less stressful.

Anna
Anna
4 months ago

I think it is a great idea to do crossword puzzles, or some Sudoku puzzles…These activities help us keep our minds sharp, so why not.
But I’m surprised this article didn’t mention Word Wow!
You assemble words made of three letters (and that’s limited) or more to crush tiles (and no, it’s not Bookworm, but maybe similar).
The more words created, the more tiles are wiped away to help the worm to continue it’s journey to the bottom of the screen.
I’ve been playing Word Wow for at least two years now and LOVE it!

Vicki
Vicki
4 months ago

It would be a great deal more helpful if people my age at least mixed the crosswords and all the other rubbish with walks.
I speak from experience here!
There is a saying that, to avoid dementia, you should do The Times Cryptic Crossword every day and walk a mile. I’ve always assumed that one out of two isn’t bad, but after a year of lock down, I realize I’ve made a stupid mistake!
Loads of finished crosswords are very satisfactory, but you are in trouble if you can no longer carry them out for recycling!

Maira
3 months ago

Thanks for sharing the information. Very informative for our clients.

Theodore
Theodore
1 month ago

I was a big fan of doing crossword puzzles, as far as I remember. A few years ago, when I was still working, I used to buy crossword magazines every week on my way back home. Since then, my health condition has changed slightly, and now it’s more difficult for me to go out there and buy magazines because of my mobility issue. Are there any free smartphone apps for doing crosswords? I’ll appreciate it if anyone could send me the download links.

Jeremy Douglas
Jeremy Douglas
27 days ago

If you enjoy crossword puzzle apps, Scrabble is a terrific game to play. I enjoy creating new words and topping my own high scores. If you don’t own the board game, don’t have anyone to play with, or just want to play by yourself, I’d recommend the EA Scrabble app.

JonesJonathan
JonesJonathan
27 days ago

I loved this list. These are the type of games I was looking for.

Lily
Lily
11 days ago

The best puzzle or task is the one your loved one will do.
When my dad showed early signs of dementia, a friend sent some sudoku pages for her. Dad shouted and threw them on the floor. “I don’t do math!”
Of course, I know now that my dad’s dementia affected his mental abilities. Still, he refused to play a game of Scrabble with me all his life, and I never knew him to attempt a crossword. He was deeply fearful that he was “stupid” and never challenged himself with a trivial game he may fail at…